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Bardi Golriz

Registered: 01/03/13
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #1 

I'm seeing quite a love-in for the new Twitter Windows Phone app. There's one new feature in specific that has got me wondering: 

Streamlined navigation brings you the new Home, Connect, Discover and Me 
tabs (emphasis mine)

It doesn't use the panaroma or pivot navigation paradigms that have become a part of Windows Phone apps' furnishings (first and third party apps that I use anyway). By taking a more platform agnostic approach and seemingly adhering to popular convention, it's actually being unconventional from a Windows Phone (and Metro) perspective. And, I like that. A lot. 

Admittedly, the update may not blend into the core OS as seamlessly as other Windows Phone apps that strictly follow the Metro design language, but this doesn't make it any less intuitive or pretty. On the contrary, it's fast, easy and (most importantly) fresh


I'm not advocating Windows Phone developers to suddenly engage in mass rebellion against Metro. But it would be nice to see them think out of the box a little more. Even if it means to look elsewhere for inspiration. To see if their furniture can be rearranged for a better experience. Or if the whole place needs to knocked down to make room for something new. After all, Metro isn't execution. It's a philosophy

Update: I was made aware of the following tweet from Windows Phone designer Jon Bell:

That is, new Twitter technically uses a pivot and so I was wrong to say it didn't. I didn't consider it a pivot as I considered the lack of visual cue to suggest a horizontal swipe is supported and the ability to jump to any section as enough practical differences for it to not be a considered a pivot. Apparently not. In any case, I'm happy to lose on semantics because that doesn't really matter. I'm more happy that Jon welcomed the evolution of the pivot, which is essentially what I was asking for originally. Developers to challenge misconceptions. 

This was a post from my blog focusing on Microsoft's devices and services' UX/UI found at http://mtrostyle.netCheck it out if you've a moment.

If you enjoyed reading it, would appreciate it if you spread the word. Catch me 
@mtrostyle.
 
Bardi Golriz

Registered: 01/03/13
Posts: 6
Reply with quote  #2 

I've just realised new Twitter is the first time I could pull-to-refresh on a Windows Phone app. Considering I've been a Windows Phone user since December 2010, it's puzzling that it's taken this long for an app to implement what's now a pretty common gesture on other platforms. The wait could be explained by of one of two reasons. Either I don't download too many apps i.e. there have been apps before new Twitter that support this gesture, which I was not aware of. Not unlikely and I hope this is why. Or, more worryingly, developers are not thinking different.

Update: I was reminded of Twitter's patent application for pull-to-refresh as the possible reason why other apps on Windows Phone have hesitated from using this gesture. This doesn't wash with me because it was just an application that doesn't appear to have been granted yet. Moreover, since the application was made, UIRefreshControl was introduced in iOS 6's SDK. And high profile apps were supporting the gesture before the patent application and continued to do so after. Finally, another Verge user mleone47 let me know that Fancy on Windows Phone has supported pull-to-refresh ever since it was released; the date of its first user review suggest this was mid-July 2012.

Update 2@Andersson shared this Loren Brichter April 2012 tweet. Of course, for those not in the know, Loren invented pull-to-refresh in Tweetie, which was acquired by Twitter back in 2010.

 

This was another post from my blog focusing on Microsoft's devices and services' UX/UI found at http://mtrostyle.netCheck it out if you've a moment.
 
If you enjoyed reading it, would appreciate it if you spread the word. Catch me 
@mtrostyle.

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